French designer, Sara Ouhaddou’s support of Moroccan craftsmanship & her own heritage: She promotes a modern, sustainable, approach to selected crafts. See Blogroll for a link.

Sara Ouhaddou’s work with craftsmen & crafswomen is under her Madin Medin project. All text has been taken from her MadinMedin site with minor changes for the sake of fluency /

_MG_7018

_MG_7006

_MG_7028

Targa Road -Woven // Un-Woven: Embroidered Rubber is a way to recycle rubber. MadinMedin use the rubber as a fabric or a piece of leather. Sculpted, embroidered, polish, it looses its recycle aspect and becomes a noble material. Maâlem Lahcen, Maâlma Amina (Craftsman Lahcen, Craftswomen Amina) /

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

IMG_1023

Targa Road // Woven/Un-woven #2, Embroidered recycle rubber. How to create a new material from a recycle one. The rubber become a king of « fabric embroidered » /

file_1000x667_006089

From the Red clay of Ourika Valley to the Porcelain of Limoges: (Craftsman Said, craftswomen Fouzia & craftswomen Marine). ‘A cross sharing project between the craftsmen of Ourika Valley in Morocco and the craftswomen of Limoges in France. The Moroccan learned about a new king of ceramic, new technical process and tools but also new behaviour and fire techniques. The French have opened their minds to new blood, and face a new philosophy of creation. This a venture leads all of us to new horizons for ceramic.’/

IMG_2081

IMG_2082

Ourika Road // Impression/Impression #2, White ceramic from Ourika: Maâlam DAMAS (Craftsman DAMAS) /

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ourika Road // Impression/Impression Red tiles, Maâlam Damas & Said (Craftsmen Damas & Said): ‘The handcrafted ceramic tile collection is influenced by the delicate mosaic tradition of Fez with its Spanish/Arabic roots. Each tile, of which there are five different patterns, is hand sculpted and unique as a result of the firing technique, which creates a subtle difference between each one. The attention and commitment to handcrafted detail strongly aligns this project with Moroccan craft tradition while the dynamic tension evoked through bold use of space and depth clearly places this work in the contemporary sphere.’/

IMG_2088

IMG_2087

Ourika Road // Impression/Impression #3, White clay from Ourika: Maâlam DAMAS (Craftsman DAMAS) /

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

IMG_0828

Above image: Titaween in Paris /First 2 images: Titaween Project,The embroidery of Tetouan. Maâlma Fatima and her students (Craftswomen Fatima and her students) Mariam, Asna, Bouchra: ‘The first step of an item is the research. To embroide rubber, we had to find Moroccan traditional art or embroidery, that’s why MedinMadin thought about Tetouan. The specific embroidery of the city needed a fresh start. To learn and help young students to feel the passion for their art again, we had a workshop with the students of the ART&CRAFT School (DAR SANAÂ) of Tetouan.’ /

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Titaween Project, embroidery pattern from Tetouan, Maâlma Sanâa (Craftswoman Sanâa): ‘How to re-create the cultural patrimony of Tetouan city, North Morocco. How to re-write the classical embroidery or Tetouan through a process of deconstruction.  With several embroiderers of Tetouan we have broken all the classical codes to renew it. For the the craftswomen it was a real step forward. All generations from the oldest to the youngest were freed by the new inspiration. 3 new patterns borne from the workshop.’ /

1

3

EXHIBITION : LE MOULIN D’ART CONTEMPORAIN // LA VALETTE DU VAR, Exposition collective / November 2015- February 2016 – WOVEN//UN-WOVEN Embroidered recycled rubber: ‘Embroidery from Tétouan, Titaween pattern, embroidered by the Embroideress of Tetouan. Recycle rubber from Targa road, cleaned, polished, varnished by the craftsmen of Targa.’ /

IMG_2481 Int

CULTURUNNERS // DETROIT CITY:  ‘I remember buying a book in Paris called ‘Les Fabuleuses Ruines de Detroit’, which caught my imagination and shaped my feeling about the city. When I came to Detroit for the first time earlier this year, I had the chance to re-claim that image and even leave a trace of myself in this great city.’

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s