Wang Jin’s Beijing Opera robes or ‘high tech rubbish’, woven from clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC), made in the late 1990’s & only part of his overall work. See Blogroll for a link (under WJ) to the Friedman Benda Gallery.

(In discussing Wang Jin’s robes) “…he feels plastic can represent perfectly contemporary society. It is a consumer product and omnipresent in developing countries. The artist calls it high tech rubbish “Reproducing the iconic robe in a modern material describes the flow of tradition through contemporary life.” Catalogue essay for Xianfeng! Chinese Avant Garde Sculpture, Julia Colman /

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Chinese Dream, 2006 PVC with embroidered fishing thread. 75 x 77 x 8 inches /

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Chinese Dream, 2006 – PVC with embroidered fishing thread /

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Dream of China No. 2, 1998 – Black & white photograph /

Wang Jin Dragon Robe

Chinese Contemporary Art - Galleries in Beijing, London, New York Wang JinChina Dreams – Wangfujing, 2004- Photograph /

Dream of China

Dream of China

Dream of China

Dream of China –  Polyvinyl chloride with vinyl filament, iron chain, hook /

Robe by Wang Jin. Robe (detail) 1999 | Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and fishing line | Gift of an anonymous donor through the Queensland Art Gallery Foundation 2011. Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program | Collection: Queensland Art Gallery

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Dream of China No. 3, 1998 -C-print /

WANG JIN A Chinese Dream, 2006 PVC with embroidered fishing thread 82 7/10 × 63 × 15 7/10 in 210 × 160 × 40 cm copyright: Wang Jin courtesy: gabrielle ammann // gallery, cologne

A Chinese Dream – PVC /

Wang Jin http://www.jingdaily.com/chinese-design-takes-the-stage-in-germany/22449/

Wang Jin, The Dream of China (plastic)

Wang Jin Transparent polyvinyl and embroidered with fishing thread 70.9 x 63 x 7.9 in

Transparent polyvinyl and embroidered with fishing thread /

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